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1551 EDWARD VI CROWN

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Edward VI (1547-53), fine issue, 1551-53, Crown, 30.75g, 1551, m.m. y, king, crowned and holding a sword, riding right, rev. shield over long cross fourchée (N.1933; S.2478) – Weight 31.10 grams

A really superb depiction of the King on horseback with wonderful eye appeal and overall a really good Very Fine with a handsome old patina. 

Provenance – Ex St James Auction 1, lot 437.  

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1623-4 JAMES I mm LIS HALFCROWN

£ 795.00
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£ 795.00

James I (1603-1625), Third coinage, Halfcrown, king on horseback with groundline, rev plume above shield (Welsh Silver) mm. Lis (N 2123; S 2667) – weight 14.60 grams

A few marks on the obverse otherwise a Good Fine example of this rare halfcrown

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1625 CHARLES I MM. LIS UNITE – EX J G BROOKER

£ 5,750.00
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£ 5,750.00

Charles I (1625 – 49), Gold Unite, Tower mint under the King (1625 – 42), Group A, mm. lis (1625),Crowned first bust l., wearing ruff and collar, mark of value behind, rev. crowned, square-topped, garnished shield (S.2685; N.2146)

A exceptional example of this first bust with the King wearing his coronation robes. The coin crispyly s truck with a much sharper and well defined portrait than normally seen for this issue. Virtually as made thus very rare

Provenance

Ex J G Brooker (not in Syalloge)

Ex Spink .Auction 29/11/1989 lot 24.

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1625-6 CHARLES I CROSS CALVARY over LIS HALFCROWN

£ 650.00
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£ 650.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Tower Mint under the King (1625 – 42), Halfcrown, Group I, First horseman type 1a3, King on horseback, no rose on housing, no ground-line mm Cross Calvary over Lis/ Cross Calvary, rev. Square-topped shield (S.2766 ; N.2202 ; Hawkins 1a3; Brooker – ; Bull 38/2 [plate coin page 117, Volume I]) – Weight 14.85 grams

Struck on an unusually full and round flan, approaching Very Fine with a softly struck horseman (presumably the die virtually on its last legs). 1 of only 4 examples known, 2 of which are now in the Ashmolean and British Museum Collections.

 

Provanance 

From the Private collection of the author of “The Halfcrowns of Charles I ” books, Maurice Bull (Bought in 1988)

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1626 – 27 CHARLES I mm. NEGROS HEAD UNITE

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Charles I (1625 – 49 , unite, Tower mint under the King (1625 – 42), mm. negro’s head (1626-7), crowned second bust l., wearing ruff and collar, mark of value behind, rev. crowned, square-topped, garnished shield, wt. 9.06gms. (S.2687; N.2148; Brooker -) Weight 8.97 grams

One of the most unusual, scarce and desirable mm’s from Charles I reign. This Unite is overall a very pleasing specimen, glowing with orange lustre, and but for the weakness at the bottom of the kings bust the coin is overall Very Fine. The reverse mm amongst the clearest we have encountered. Furthermore this die combination not featured in the J.G.Brooker Collection.

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1626 CHARLES I (SO CALLED) PATTERN HALFCROWN

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Charles I (1625-1649), Silver medal (so-called Pattern Halfcrown),, bust left in high relief, rev. crowned shield within Garter, all within a laurel border  (Bull 695 [ this piece]; MI I, 373/266).

Cast and chased in the style of engraving, Very fine and very rare.

This intriguing issue has always been a numismatic oddity, with Thomas Rawlins listed rather loosely as its creator, however this coins appearance in particular the style of portraiture doesn’t match his work. After extensive research into our archive, we believe this is in fact the work of Abraham Vanderdort, who was the curator of several of the Kings collections.

On 2nd April 1625, shortly after Charles I’s accession, Charles summon to his presence Sir William Villiers (the warden of the mint) and Abraham Vanderdort. In the presence of the Duke of Buckingham, Charles commanded Vanderdort to make patterns for “his Majesties coynes and also give his assistance to the ingravers and his furtherance that the same may be well engraver according to their abilities”. Charles desired that a warrant be drawn up giving him an annual fee of £40 for that service. On 14th May 1625 Vanderdort received his appointment as “Maister Imbosser and Marker of Medales to us and our heirs and successors of all sizes and quantities to be bought in Gould and silver and brasse moulded and pressed “.

In a letter from the Mint addressed to the secretary of state Lord Conway on 7th January 1625/6, it is noted that the Officers of the Mint can’t deliver coins using Vanderdorts patterns as “the imbossements are made so high in the patterns that they will not rise in the moneys the moneys being so board and thin as they now are made”. Also in the letter its discussed that the Mint wouldn’t be able to produce enough coin required for bullion using these dies.

Although we can’t definitively say that this is the work of Vanderdoort, we believe with the above issues the mint had producing coins using the dies Vanderdort made, and the description of a high relief coin, broad and thin, and with the actual style of portrait used on the coin, its more likely to be his work than Rawlins. The Juxon Medal is arguably Vanderdort’s most famous work and the bust of that medal is very similar stylistically.

Provenance

The plate coin featured in Bulls “the Halfcrowns of Charles I”

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1626 CHARLES I CORONATION MEDAL

£ 1,400.00
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£ 1,400.00

Charles I (1625 – 49), Coronation 1626, the official silver medal, by Nicolas Briot, crowned bust r., wearing ruff, collar of Order of the Garter and coronation robes, signed N.B., rev. arm issuing from clouds holding sword, DONEC PAX RED-DITA TERRIS(MI.243/10; Eimer 106; BMC [Jones] 125-126; Woll.ii; vL.II, 164; Cook 11; Platt pp.117-18)

To date the most alluring example of this coronation medal we have encountered. The toning simply breathtaking, about Extremely fine with a few stray surface marks in the fields.
 
Variety where sword divides legend after first D in REDDITA.

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1626 CHARLES I mm Cross Calvary HALFCROWN

£ 850.00
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£ 850.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Tower Mint under the King (1625 – 42), Halfcrown, Group I, First horseman, type 1a3,  no groundline, King on horseback holding sword above shoulder. rev. Square topped shield, crown like garnishing, mm Cross Calvary (S.2766; N.2202; Hawkins 1a3; Brooker – ; Bull 51a/6 [this coin]) – Weight 14.53 grams

Approaching Very Fine and excessively rare. This the only specimen known in private hands for this die variety, the other being in the British Museums Collection.

Provenance

From the Private collection of the author of “The Halfcrowns of Charles I ” books, Maurice Bull (Bought in 1997)

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1627 – 28 CHARLES I MM CASTLE UNITE

£ 1,650.00
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£ 1,650.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Unite, Tower mint under the king (1625 – 42), Group B, mm. Castle/ Castle over Negros Head (1627-8), crowned second bust left., mark of value behind, rev. crowned square-topped garnished shield  (S.2687; N.2148 ; Brooker -)

Cleaned with signs of a crimped flan still evident, otherwise Fine and a die not represented in the J G Brooker Sylloge.

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1629 – 30 CHARLES I TOWER MINT MM HEART HALFCROWN

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Tower mint under the King (1625 – 42) Halfcrown, Group II, type 2/1b Mule, second horseman, smaller figure of the king in armour with sword over his shoulder, on taller horse striding left, plume on horses’s head, rose on housing, reads MAG BR FR ET HI, rev. Lightly garnished square shield, large plume above mm. Heart (S.2768; N.2204; Bull 76/7) – Weight 14.68 grams

About Very Fine, extremely rare with a strong provenance. One of a few surviving examples of this brief transitional issue.

PROVENANCE

Ex V.J.E. Ryan Collection Part II, Glendining Auction, 22-4 January 1952, lot 1088

Ex R. Carlyon-Britton Collection; with Seaby 1959

Ex Dr. E. Burstal Collection, Glendining Auction, 15-16 May 1968, lot 267

Ex T.W.J.D. Dupree Collection

Ex P. Hunt Collection

Ex C. Adams Collection, Spink Auction 177, 1 December 2005, lot 82

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1633 CHARLES I mm PORTCULLIS CROWN

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Charles I (1625-1649), Tower mint, Crown, Group III, type 3b, mm. portcullis, rev oval shield without CR plume over shield,  (FRC XIV/XVIII [Sale, lot –]; SCBI Brooker –; N 2196; S 2759) Weight – 29.57 grams

Very fine + with dark cabinet tone, the mint mark rare for the type and not represented in J.G. Brooker’s Collection.

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1636 CHARLES I contemporary forgery of a Tower mint HALFCROWN

£ 750.00
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£ 750.00

Charles I (1625-1649), A contemporary forgery of a Tower mint Halfcrown, as Group II, mm. tun on rev. only, second horseman, no ground line rev. large oval garnished shield between C R, reads c · arolvs, reversed g in regno (Bull F3; SCBI Brooker 1186 [= Lockett 3404], same dies) weight – 15.61 grams

A contemporay forgery of good style, metal and weight, and in our opinion the work of a Tower Mint apprentice. Of the known other coins struck from this die, includes the J G Brookers specimen (1186), which was also formerly in the possesion of R C Lockett (lot 3404), Ex H Montagu, part II, Sotheby, 13 November 1896, lot 579 – £19.0.0, and Ex H Webb, part I, Sotheby, 9-14 July 1894, lot 413 – “this is struck on a piece of silver of diamond shape, well preserved and extra rare” – £20.10.0. In the Brooker Sylloge this actual coin is referenced as “a die duplicate is in the Messrs Baldwins forgery cabinet, on a properly sheared blank”. This also the illustrated coins featured in Bulls ” The Halfcrowns of Charles I”, Volume V.

  • In January 2019, the Brooker example of this contemporary forgery sold for £1860 in the Spink Auction 19025, lot 1694 where the following notes were added “Imitations struck from these dies are also known in base metal (cf. Adams, Spink 177, lot 100 and DNW 43, 8-9 October 1999, lot 631). Furthermore, at the Sotheby sale of 23 June 1898, lot 115 featured “an impression in pewter of a Tower Halfcrown, type 2c, m.m. on rev. ton”, the dies of which the cataloguer added: “are said to have been found beneath the Houses of Parliament and that only two examples were struck, the second one being in the BM”.

Provenance 

Ex Messrs A.H.Baldwins Forgery cabinet 

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1640 – 1 CHARLES I REVERSE MULE HALFCROWN – UNIQUE

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Tower Mint, Mule of two reverse false dies, mm. star (1640-1) Halfcrown (Brooker 1190 [hhis coin] ; Bull F1) – weight 14.70 grams

A Unique and fascinating false dies Error Halfcrown with a exceptional pedigree stretching back to the 18th century. Being contemporay, it is conceiveable, that this was possibly the work of a apprentice die sinker. 

Provenance 

Ex Bridgewater House Collection, Sothebys 15th  November 1972, lot  317

Ex J.G.Brooker Collection , 1190

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1641 – 3 CHARLES I mm TRIANGLE HALFCROWN

£ 375.00
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£ 375.00

Charles I (1625-49) Tower Mint under the King (1625-42) Group III, mm. Triangle, third horseman, Cloak from shoulder, groundline below horse (s.2776; N.2212; Bull 394c/32)

Some doubling in the  legends otherwise a bold horseman and an attractively toned Very Fine. 

Provenance

Ex Arthur Chesser Collection (formed in the 1950/60’s)

Ex DNW Auction, 17/09/2013, lot 24 (realised £310)

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1642 CHARLES I OXFORD MINT HALF POUND

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Civil War coinages, Oxford, 1642-46, Half-Pound, 1642, m.m. plume/pellets, horseman left, arms on ground below, Oxford plume behind, rev. Declaration in two lines, Oxford plumes above, date below (cf Brooker 867; N.2404; S.2945)-  Weight 59.80 grams

Attractive deep tone, full and round, about extremely fine, a delightful example!

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1642 EARL OF ESSEX MILITARY REWARD BADGE

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Robert Devereaux, 3rd Earl of Essex (1591-1646), Captain-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Parliamentary army, oval gilt-silver Military Reward badge, 1642, by Thomas Rawlins, half length armoured bust three-quarters left, wide lace collar, holding sword, SX above head, legend in script in two lines, “Should hear both houses of parliament for true religion and subjects freedom stand – Pro Religione lege Rege et Parliamento”, rev., the two Houses of Parliament with King and Speaker, wreath border around to both sides, 55.5 x 38mm (MI 295/113; Eim. 140A; Platt II, pp. 79-80)

Integral suspension loop and ring. Extremely fine and rare.

Devereaux was the eldest son of Elizabeth I’s favourite who had been executed in 1602. He had been a successful commander of forces in the Netherlands and his Parliamentary appointments came with the commencement of the Civil War. 

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1643 CHARLES I OXFORD MINT HALFCROWN

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Silver Halfcrown, Oxford mint (142 – 46) 1643, mm. Oxford plume on obv. only, Oxford horseman, Oxford plume behind, rev. Declaration, three Oxford plumes above, date below (S.2954; N 2413)
Good fine, some signs of excavation still evident
Provenance
Ex Mark Rasmussen
Ex Alan Morris Collection
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1643 CHARLES I OXFORD MINT POUND

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Pound, Oxford mint, mm. plume, 1643, mm. plume, crowned figure of king on horseback to l., trampling on scattered armour and weapons, sword raised high, plume behind, rev. Declaration in two lines, three plumes and value above, XX, between pellets, date below. (S.2938; N.2397; Morrieson A/2; SCBI, Brooker 863) – Weight  120.25 grams

One of the most impressive issues of the English Civil War. Reputedly made as payment for the most senior officers of the Royalist army, this ginourmous issue weighing 120 grams is incredibly impressive to handle. A true piece of English Civil War History !  Slight double-striking by OL of CAROLVS, otherwise very fine, with a pleasing blue patina.

Provenance

K. V. Graham Collection, Glendinings, 12 June 1963, lot 109 (£125)

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1643 CHARLES I OXFORD MINT POUND

£ 14,250.00
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£ 14,250.00

Charles I (1625-49), silver Pound, 1643, the 3 of date struck over 2. Oxford Mint (1642-46), King on horseback left with raised sword and flowing sash, horse prancing over arms and armour including cannon, Oxford plume in field behind, all within beaded circle, legend and outer beaded circle surrounding, mm. Oxford plume, CAROLVS: D: G: MAGNI: BRITANE: FRAN: ET HIB: REX, rev. Declaration in two lines across center, RELIG. PROT. LEG / ANG. LIBER. PAR, value between stops and Oxford plumes above, date below, beaded circles and legend surrounding, initial mark seven pellets, EXVRGAT: DEVS: DISSIPENTVR: INIMICI (Brooker 863A; Morrieson B-1; N 2398; S 2940; KM 239.2) Weight – 120.10 grams

Toned, with usual hammered edge, some small nicks and surface marks, however Very fine 

Provenance

The St Petersburg Collection, Heritage Long Beach Auction, 2nd June 2006, lot 13096.

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1643-4 CHARLES I YORK MINT HALFCROWN

£ 1,900.00
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£ 1,900.00

Charles I (1625-1649), York mint, Halfcrown, Group 3 [type 6], mm. lion, ebor below horse, rev. crowned oval shield, crowned c r at sides,  (Bull 571; Besly 3D; SCBI Brooker 1082; N 2314; S 2868) –  weight 14.92 grams.

Slight metal stress behind the King’s head showing a pin head of daylight otherwise, an exceptional example and about Extremely Fine.

Provenance 

Ex Lloyd Bennett, £1600 May 2009

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1643-4 CHARLES I YORK MINT HALFCROWN

£ 1,700.00
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£ 1,700.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Halfcrown York mint (1643-4) Halfcrown, Group 2 [type 2], mm. lion, grass groundline, rev. oval garnished shield, (Bull 551; Besly 1B; SCBI Brooker 1077, same dies; N 2310; S 2864) – weight 14.67 grams

Although the flan has split from the pressure of the screw press, this doesn’t detract from the attractive specimen. Very fine with a pleasing old tone.

Provenance

Ex Spink Numismatic Circular Oct 1990 (6038) – “Dupree Collection”

 

Beslys – The York Mint of Charles I

York was Charles I’s ‘second capital’, and after being forced to leave London early in 1642 he made his way there, arriving on 19 March. Until the middle of August his court was based at York or Beverley, whence he directed operations against the port of Hull. The establishment of a mint at York was being planned long before the outbreak of formal hostilities. Nicholas Briot, the king’s engraver, was summoned to York by a letter from Secretary of State Edward Nicholas dated 6 May in connection with Briot’s proposals concerning currency standards.

Shortly after, arrangements were made for Sir William Parkhurst,

warden of the Mint, to advance Briot the money necessary for his journey. On 15 July, these plans received a severe setback when a ship carrying Briot’s equipment and personal baggage was held up off Scarborough by one Captain Stevens, who seized the equipment on the grounds that no authority had been given for its removal. Meanwhile on 7 July, David Ramage, a member of Briot’s staff, was paid £85 10s. for the provision of ‘several instruments for the two Mints at York and Shrewsbury’.8

All of the above information is well known. However, one further document exists from the summer of 1642 which relates to the proposed mint and is possibly the most important of the series, if the information it contains is correct, since it supplies us at last with aterminus post quern for the York mint. On 15 July, a warrant arrived at York for the establishment of the mint. This information comes from a letter from Beverley dated 16 July 1642 and printed in London on 20 July. Communication with London was still fairly easy, and there exist printed copies of many such newsletters. The information they conveyed often exaggerated such matters as numbers of troops, sums of money and so on, but they give a lively picture of royalist preparations for war, and there seems little reason to doubt the accuracy of this piece of news. It is worth quoting in full, because although it was printed in the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal in 1882, it seems hitherto to have escaped numismatic attention.9 The main text of the letter deals with events at Hull, but tucked away at the end we read:

FRIDAY, a warrant under His Majestie’s Broade Seale came to Yorke for the erecting of a new Mynt there, some commissioners appointed for the same came to view the place, where the old Mynt stood, which is now in Sir William Saviles possession, near the Minster, where it appears money was coyned in Hen. 8. Raigne.

The same letter tells us that on the Monday the king had left Beverley on a journey to the north Midlands, visiting Doncaster and Newark. The building referred to is St Leonard’s Hospital, whither the mint had been transferred in 1546.10 However, we hear nothing further of the mint until the statement published by Christopher Hildyard in 1664, and brought to light by Davies in 1854, that ‘about the latter end of January [1643], the King’s Mint began to coin in Sir Henry Jenkins’ house in the Minster Yard’, which at first sight appears to contradict the earlier statement.” This building is better known as St William’s College, a college of priests built c. 1465 and dissolved in 1549, after which it passed through various hands. Today it belongs to the Church and is used by the convocation of the province of York.12 It seems to have been taken over by the royalists immediately on Charles’s arrival in 1642, since Hildyard also tells us that the king’s printers set up their presses there on 24 March 1642.13 Hildyard’s statements come in a year-by-year list of lord mayors and sheriffs of York, together with notable events of each year, which on the whole seem to be fairly accurately recorded.

The case for St Leonard’s Hospital as the site of the mint rests on the York mint’s location there under Henry VIII and the fact that the commissioners appointed in 1642 promptly went to examine its suitability. It was also referred to as ‘Mint Yard’ in notices referring to sequestered assets in 1646-48,14 but a place name need not reflect the continuing use of a locality for that purpose. Against this must be weighed Hildyard’s single, but positive, statement that coining actually did take place at ‘Sir Henry Jenkins

house in the Minster Yard’. His statement that coining began in January 1643 is almost certainly correct (below, p.223), so unless new evidence comes to light to the contrary, it is proposed that Hildyard’s statement that the York mint of Charles I was located in St William’s College in Minster Yard should be accepted (pi. 7). Farquhar, unaware of the reference to the warrant and Sir William Savile’s house, suggested that minting operations were carried on at St Leonard’s Hospital until January 1643 but ‘being inadequate to the strain cast upon it, it was supplemented in 1643 by the presses in the King’s printing house’. This probably overstates the case. The two possible locations for the mint can perhaps best be reconciled in terms of its transfer from one to the other (if indeed any operations had started) in the autumn of 1642, when the vacation of St William’s College by the king’s printers may have provided more suitable accommodation for the mint.

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1644 CHARLES I BRISTOL MINT HALFCROWN

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Charles I (1625-1649), Bristol mint, Halfcrown, 1644, mm. plumelet, large plume behind horseman, br monogram below, rev. Declaration in two lines, three Bristol plumes above, date and br monogram below (S.3009; N. 2491; Morr. D-6b; Brooker 983ff)

A most elegant and well struck Bristol Horseman, Good Very Fine, with an alluring steel grey tone.

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1644 CHARLES I EXETER MINT HALFCROWN

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Charles I (1625-1649), Exeter mint, Halfcrown, 1644, mm. rose, horse with twisted tail, rev. oval scroll-garnished shield, date to left of mm., (S 3076; N.2568; Bull 665/34; Besly N34; SCBI; Brooker -)

A superb example with a very bold and characterful horseman. Bull only records three specimens for this die variety, one of which is in the British Museums collection.

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1644 CHARLES I OXFORD MINT HALFCROWN

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Charles I, (1625-1649) Silver Halfcrown, 1644,. Oxford mint (1642-46). King on horseback. Rev. Latin Declaration in two lines, three Oxford plumes above, date below. (S.2965)

Weakness in strike centrally, toned Good Fine

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1644 CHARLES I RAWLINS CROWN BRISTISH MUSEUM ELECTROTYPE

£ 700.00
0 Reviews
£ 700.00

Charles I (1625 – 49), Oxford mint (1642 – 46) , Rawlins’ crown in lead, mm. floriated cross on obverse only, 1644, crowned figure of king on horseback l., brandishing sword, riding over a view of the city, rev. floral scrolls above and below Declaration, value and three plumes above, date and OXON below ( As – S.2948; N.2407; Morr.A-I)

The Rawlins crown is the finest examples of Thomas Rawlins work. The presence of King Charles I in Oxford in during the English Civil War, is preserved in this remarkably engraved coin, known as the Oxford Crown.  The obverse die bears the Kings equestrian portrait placed against the Oxford cityscape. It was during the English civil war that the King made Oxford (1642 – 46) his Royalist capital and lived at Christ Church and the Queen at Merton College. The reverse of the crown dates the coin to 1644 and advertises Charles’s aims in the Civil war – to uphold the Protestant religion, the laws of England and the freedom of Parliament. The Oxford mint was set up at New Inn Hall, at the present site of St Peter’s College, in January 1642. It was overseen by Thomas Bushell and Sir William Pankhurst, former Wardens of the Shrewsbury and Tower Mints. Stocked with silver from Oxford and Cambridge colleges, and with converted foreign money, the Oxford mint was a hugely successful enterprise and managed to cover Charles’s needs for coinage in his war effort.

Examples of the original Oxford Rawlins Crown are amongst the most sought after, valuable and desirable coins of the entire English series. With specimens almost exclusively reserved in museums collections, this British Museum electrotype is a exceptional piece for any Crown or Charles I collector.  As J.G.Brooker’s example (1269) this electrotype of the Oxford Rawlins Crown, struck in lead from the specimen in the British Museum and is the next best thing to the original !

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1644 CHARLES I WELSH MARCHES HALFCROWN

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Charles I  (1625-1649) Halfcrown, Welsh Marches, mm: plume. Dated 1644. crude workmanship after the style of Bristol, Charles on horseback left, holding reins with left hand and sword in right rev. Declaration in two lines divided by row of pellets, three plumes above, date below, (Bull 684; SCBI Brooker 1212, same dies; N –; S 3135) – Weight 14.80 grams

One of the most enigmatic coinage issues of the Engish Civl war. The handful of known (12) examples are all of crude manufacture, and appear to have been made on a simple rocker press (like the Hartlebury Castle issue) and the with the form of Declaration style follows that of Bristol, certainly suggest a western origin. For issue this example is probably much as struck and extremely rare.

*In Maurice Bulls Book “The Halfcrowns of Charles I”, he lists 12 examples of this exceptionally rare halfcrown, with one referred to as “Hawkins 509 (unseen)”. Having obtained images of all of the other listed specimens and knowing that when Mr. Bull photographed the BM’s entire halfcrown collection of Charles I, there wasnt a specimen there, we have via the process of elimination conlcuded that this is infact the coin illustrated in Hawkins. Up until the 1920’s it wasnt unheard of for the British Museum curators to sell off coins that they may not of fancied at the time or to have sold off duplicates to collectors and dealers. This appears to be the case with this coin, as up until the mid 20th Century there was a doubt to the mints actual existence.

Provanance

Ex Alan Morris Collection

Ex Hawkins “The Silver Coinage of England” plate coin 509, from 1876 

Ex British Museum Collection 

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1645 – 49 CHARLES I ROYALIST BADGE by T.RAWLINS

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Royalist badge, crowned bust right wearing Collar and George of the Garter, carolvs d g mag britan fran et hib rex fi d, rev., crowned Royal arms within Garter, wreath border on both sides.

Royalist Badges such as this example cast and chased by the renowned medalist and engraver Thomas Rawlins are an iconic part of the English Civil War. Used as a sign of showing support to the Royalist cause, they in our opinion go hand in hand with the coinage from this era.

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1645 CHARLES I EXETER MINT CROWN

£ 850.00
0 Reviews
£ 850.00

Charles I (1625-49) Crown, Exeter Mint mm. Castle, 1645, Charles on horseback left, holding reins and sword rev. Coat of arms within garnished frame (S.3062; N.2561; Brooker 1045 [same dies]; Besly D/30)

Good fine with a fairly pleasing portrait of the king on horseback.

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