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1552 Edward VI Crown

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Edward VI (1547 – 53) Crown, 1552, King on horseback with date below horse Rev. Shield on cross; mm. tun (s2478)

Better than Very Fine

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1626-7 CHARLES I NEGRO’S HEAD GOLD DOUBLE CROWN

£ 945.00
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£ 945.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Tower mint under the King (1625-42) Gold double crown (half-unite) mm. Negros head (1627) Group B, second bust, in ruff, armour and mantle, rev. Square-topped shield (S.2699 : Brooker -) weight 4.45 grams

The obverse mm and reverse mm are different abductions of this most controversial mint mark with the obverse being a smaller head and the reverse the more familiar design. The J G Brooker collection was without the die variation thus we presume very rare. As depicted in our photos there is a very small area of the edge missing however the coins weight for type is still acceptable. The coin is accompanied by a old handwritten ticket indicating it was bought in “3/71”

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1642 Charles I Exeter Mint Halfcrown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Exeter Mint (1643 – 46) Halfcrown, 1642, m.m. rose, king on horse of neat style, galloping over arms, in his right hand he holds a baton rev. oval garnished shield with date (1642) in cartouche at bottom (N.2534, S.3071: Brooker 1013 [same dies])

The 1642 Exeter Mint Halfcrown of Charles I, is one of the most intriguing and rare coins issued during the English Civil War. For decades numismatists have debated its authenticity, due to its far greater artistic detail when compared with other coins struck from this era and further confusion has been caused by its origin.

Provenance

ex H M Lingford, collection bt Baldwin 1951

The finely detailed obverse portrays the king riding to the left on a galloping horse riding over arms and holding in his left hand a baton somewhat resembles the design used by Thomas Simons on the 1639 Scottish Rebellion medal, a comparison previously mentioned by the famous collector Miss H. Farquhar.

 The mintmark rose found at 12 o’clock on this coin gives a clue too its origins as this mark has always been associated with both the Truro and Exeter Mints. With two different reverse dies being known for this type coin (one with pellets the other without) past research has indicated that this halfcrown was first struck at Truro and later again at Exeter, although this is a little speculative. A further confusing element of this wonderful variety is the date, 1642. Richard Vyvyan MP for Tregony and head of one of Cornwall’s oldest landed families was commissioned to coin bullion or plate of gold or silver ‘with dies stampes and forms as the monies now current within Our Realm of England’ on 14th November 1642. With the Truro mint having only been established in the very late months of 1642 and the Exeter Mint being established in 1643/4 is the date possibly retrospective. Could the date be in reference to King Charles raising his standard at Nottingham in August 1642,signalling the start of the English Civil War or could there be a possibly link between the date be the Kings personal visit to Exeter in 1644. Having been stuck to such a high quality, and having been made in such a small number, we believe that it would have been made as a commemorative for the Kings visit, and given to important gentry.

In the mid 20th Century D. Liddell & A. Rayner wrote for the British Numismatic Journal a wonderfully detailed and insightful account  looking into the history of this coin titled “CHARLES I TRURO/EXETER HALF-CROWNS”, where 14 examples were obtained, examined, and tested.

With as few as 21 known examples, 5 of which remain in museum collections, and the ex Brooker example (1013A) previously sold by ourselves, in April 2012, finding examples today is extremely difficult. However we have recently acquired coin number 8 from the Liddell and Rayner article (the Lingford specimen) and are pleased to be able to offer the coin to the collectors market  for the first time since 2008.

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1642 Charles I Exeter Mint Halfcrown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Exeter Mint (1643 – 46) King, crowned and holding sword, riding left on spirited horse over field strewn with arms. Rev. Oval garnished shield date below in cartouche

Struck on an irregular flan, old marks in field otherwise Good Fine and Very Rare

Provenance

Ex H.P Hall Collectio, Glendinings, 1950, (198)

Ex J G Brooker Collection (1013A)

This beautiful and artistic coin is one of the most famous and desirable products of the first English Civil War between Charles I and Parliament. Dated 1642 and produced to a standard far superior to that of the normal run of Royalist provincial issues, it has long puzzled numismatists both as to its background and to its true date of issue. Only two provincial Royalist mints struck coins dated 1642, Shrewsbury and Oxford, but this piece does not correspond in any way to their output. Snelling, in 1762, illustrates an example under “unknown mints” and while he notes Folkes’ suggestion that it was coined at York when the king set up his standard there, he prefers an attribution to Exeter due to the form of the mintmark rose, associated with that mint. This attribution was confirmed by J B Bergne, NC. Vol.XII, with the discovery that the obverse die was subsequently used to strike a coin with an Exeter reverse die dated 1644, (Besly L25), however Exeter was only captured by Royalist forces under Prince Maurice on 4 September 1643 and the date remained a problem. This was solved in 1928 when Mary Coate published “The Royalist mints of Truro and Exeter”, NC 5th ser. 8. She found, from access to the Vyvyan family papers, that on 14 November 1642 Sir Richard Vyvyan received a commission “to coin or cause to be coined in such place or places as convenient both gold and silver out of the bullion which might be delivered to him for the king’s use..” and that coins were struck under this authority at Truro the mint being transferred to Exeter after the capture of the City. The 1642 halfcrown was a Truro issue. In 1992 Edward Besly published a complete reassessment of the mints of Truro and Exeter including a systematic study of the dies, BNJ 1992, pp.102-153. He found that the obverse die of the 1642 halfcrown can be dated somewhere between the late Truro period and well into 1644 when the letter punches started to be replaced. The placing of the two 1642 reverse dies is more precise. Both bear the fleur and English lion punches belonging to his group IIId, towards the end of the undated series. Nor are the reverse dies identical. The first, Besly L22 known from about fourteen specimens, bears the mintmark ‘Truro’ rose (3) and undamaged lions in the arms. The second, Besly L28 (this coin), known from seven specimens only, bears the mintmark ‘Exeter’ rose (4) and damaged lions. Besly shows conclusively that the 1642 halfcrown could not have been minted in 1642. It was struck at Exeter during 1644 and on apparently more than one occasion. Helen Farquhar had already drawn attention to the similarity between the obverse design of the halfcrown and that of the Scottish Rebellion Medal, 1639, some of which are signed T S (Thomas Simon) (Medallic Illustrations, I, pp. 282-3, 290-4). Both bear the distinctive equestrian portrait of the king holding a baton and galloping over a pile of arms, though the composition of the arms differ and on the halfcrown the king’s hair flies out behind giving an illusion of speed, and it is accepted that the medal served as a model for the skilled but unknown hand who engraved the coinage die. Michael Sharp has further suggested that, given the commemorative nature of the date and the way it forms an integral part of the shield containing the Royal arms, 1642 may refer to the raising of the king’s standard at Nottingham on 22 August 1642 at the beginning of the Civil War. The association with the Scots Rebellion medal might underline this significance, 1639 being the last previous year in which the king’s standard had been raised. The reason why a coin of such exceptional execution and design, unparalleled in any other Civil War issue, should be produced at Exeter in 1644 is not certain. Besly refers to the personal visit of the King to Exeter in July 1644, and the Royalist victory over the Earl of Essex at Lostwithiel in the following month, but there still remains some mystery attached to this fascinating piece

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1643 Charles I Bristol Mint Halfcrown

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Bristol Mint (1643 – 5) Halfcrown, 1643, mm. plume on obv., Br on rev., Bristol plumelet behind horseman, rev. Declaration, three plumes above (S.3007 N2489 Bull 638/10c; Morr. D-10; SCBI Brooker 975) – Weight 13.99 grams

A few areas of striking weakness, otherwise much as struck with a quite possibly the finest and most detailed equestrian portrait, very rare this choice !

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Halfcrown

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Oxford Mint (1642 – 46), 1643, mm. Oxford plume on obv. only, Oxford horseman, Oxford plume in field behind,  no groundline rev. colon before legend, three Oxford plumes above Declaration, date below (S 2954 : N 2413 ; Brooker 890 : Bull 601/3a ) – Weight 14.89 grams

A wonderful example, the portrait inparticular superb in comparison to what is normally encountered, attractive tone, GVF

Provenance – Ex Arthur Chesser Collection, Lot 39

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Halfpound

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Charles I, half pound, Oxford mint, mm. plume/ -, 1643, crowned figure of king on horseback, brandishing sword, plume behind, rev. declaration in two lines, three plumes and value above, date below (S.2945A; N.2404) – Weight 58.31grams

Well-centred on a very large flan, attractive grey tone, about extremely fine, and to date the finest 1643 Half pound we have handled or seen available for sale, thus rare

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Unite

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Oxford mint (1642 – 46) Unite, 1643, crowned bust l., holding sword and olive branch, mark of value behind, rev. declaration on scroll, date below, three plumes above,  mm. plume. (S.2734; N.2389) -Weight – 8.69 grams

A little weakness around the legends, otherwise struck on a good size flan, about good very fine with a strong portrait.

Provenance

Ex Heckett collection, Sotheby’s, 25 May 1977 

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Unite

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Oxford Mint (1642-6) crowned and mantled bust left, holding sword and laurel branch; XX behind Rev. Declaration RELIG : PROT/LEG : ANG/LIBER : PAR in three lines continuous scroll. Three Oxford plumes above , 1643 below

Although on a small flan overall Very Fine woth a superb portrait. 

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