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1552 Edward VI Crown

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Edward VI (1547 – 53) Crown, 1552, King on horseback with date below horse Rev. Shield on cross; mm. tun (s2478)

Better than Very Fine

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1626-7 CHARLES I NEGRO’S HEAD GOLD DOUBLE CROWN

£ 945.00
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£ 945.00

Charles I (1625 – 49) Tower mint under the King (1625-42) Gold double crown (half-unite) mm. Negros head (1627) Group B, second bust, in ruff, armour and mantle, rev. Square-topped shield (S.2699 : Brooker -) weight 4.45 grams

The obverse mm and reverse mm are different abductions of this most controversial mint mark with the obverse being a smaller head and the reverse the more familiar design. The J G Brooker collection was without the die variation thus we presume very rare. As depicted in our photos there is a very small area of the edge missing however the coins weight for type is still acceptable. The coin is accompanied by a old handwritten ticket indicating it was bought in “3/71”

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1642 Charles I Exeter Mint Halfcrown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Exeter Mint (1643 – 46) Halfcrown, 1642, m.m. rose, king on horse of neat style, galloping over arms, in his right hand he holds a baton rev. oval garnished shield with date (1642) in cartouche at bottom (N.2534, S.3071: Brooker 1013 [same dies])

The 1642 Exeter Mint Halfcrown of Charles I, is one of the most intriguing and rare coins issued during the English Civil War. For decades numismatists have debated its authenticity, due to its far greater artistic detail when compared with other coins struck from this era and further confusion has been caused by its origin.

Provenance

ex H M Lingford, collection bt Baldwin 1951

The finely detailed obverse portrays the king riding to the left on a galloping horse riding over arms and holding in his left hand a baton somewhat resembles the design used by Thomas Simons on the 1639 Scottish Rebellion medal, a comparison previously mentioned by the famous collector Miss H. Farquhar.

 The mintmark rose found at 12 o’clock on this coin gives a clue too its origins as this mark has always been associated with both the Truro and Exeter Mints. With two different reverse dies being known for this type coin (one with pellets the other without) past research has indicated that this halfcrown was first struck at Truro and later again at Exeter, although this is a little speculative. A further confusing element of this wonderful variety is the date, 1642. Richard Vyvyan MP for Tregony and head of one of Cornwall’s oldest landed families was commissioned to coin bullion or plate of gold or silver ‘with dies stampes and forms as the monies now current within Our Realm of England’ on 14th November 1642. With the Truro mint having only been established in the very late months of 1642 and the Exeter Mint being established in 1643/4 is the date possibly retrospective. Could the date be in reference to King Charles raising his standard at Nottingham in August 1642,signalling the start of the English Civil War or could there be a possibly link between the date be the Kings personal visit to Exeter in 1644. Having been stuck to such a high quality, and having been made in such a small number, we believe that it would have been made as a commemorative for the Kings visit, and given to important gentry.

In the mid 20th Century D. Liddell & A. Rayner wrote for the British Numismatic Journal a wonderfully detailed and insightful account  looking into the history of this coin titled “CHARLES I TRURO/EXETER HALF-CROWNS”, where 14 examples were obtained, examined, and tested.

With as few as 21 known examples, 5 of which remain in museum collections, and the ex Brooker example (1013A) previously sold by ourselves, in April 2012, finding examples today is extremely difficult. However we have recently acquired coin number 8 from the Liddell and Rayner article (the Lingford specimen) and are pleased to be able to offer the coin to the collectors market  for the first time since 2008.

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1642 Charles I Exeter Mint Halfcrown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Exeter Mint (1643 – 46) King, crowned and holding sword, riding left on spirited horse over field strewn with arms. Rev. Oval garnished shield date below in cartouche

Struck on an irregular flan, old marks in field otherwise Good Fine and Very Rare

Provenance

Ex H.P Hall Collectio, Glendinings, 1950, (198)

Ex J G Brooker Collection (1013A)

This beautiful and artistic coin is one of the most famous and desirable products of the first English Civil War between Charles I and Parliament. Dated 1642 and produced to a standard far superior to that of the normal run of Royalist provincial issues, it has long puzzled numismatists both as to its background and to its true date of issue. Only two provincial Royalist mints struck coins dated 1642, Shrewsbury and Oxford, but this piece does not correspond in any way to their output. Snelling, in 1762, illustrates an example under “unknown mints” and while he notes Folkes’ suggestion that it was coined at York when the king set up his standard there, he prefers an attribution to Exeter due to the form of the mintmark rose, associated with that mint. This attribution was confirmed by J B Bergne, NC. Vol.XII, with the discovery that the obverse die was subsequently used to strike a coin with an Exeter reverse die dated 1644, (Besly L25), however Exeter was only captured by Royalist forces under Prince Maurice on 4 September 1643 and the date remained a problem. This was solved in 1928 when Mary Coate published “The Royalist mints of Truro and Exeter”, NC 5th ser. 8. She found, from access to the Vyvyan family papers, that on 14 November 1642 Sir Richard Vyvyan received a commission “to coin or cause to be coined in such place or places as convenient both gold and silver out of the bullion which might be delivered to him for the king’s use..” and that coins were struck under this authority at Truro the mint being transferred to Exeter after the capture of the City. The 1642 halfcrown was a Truro issue. In 1992 Edward Besly published a complete reassessment of the mints of Truro and Exeter including a systematic study of the dies, BNJ 1992, pp.102-153. He found that the obverse die of the 1642 halfcrown can be dated somewhere between the late Truro period and well into 1644 when the letter punches started to be replaced. The placing of the two 1642 reverse dies is more precise. Both bear the fleur and English lion punches belonging to his group IIId, towards the end of the undated series. Nor are the reverse dies identical. The first, Besly L22 known from about fourteen specimens, bears the mintmark ‘Truro’ rose (3) and undamaged lions in the arms. The second, Besly L28 (this coin), known from seven specimens only, bears the mintmark ‘Exeter’ rose (4) and damaged lions. Besly shows conclusively that the 1642 halfcrown could not have been minted in 1642. It was struck at Exeter during 1644 and on apparently more than one occasion. Helen Farquhar had already drawn attention to the similarity between the obverse design of the halfcrown and that of the Scottish Rebellion Medal, 1639, some of which are signed T S (Thomas Simon) (Medallic Illustrations, I, pp. 282-3, 290-4). Both bear the distinctive equestrian portrait of the king holding a baton and galloping over a pile of arms, though the composition of the arms differ and on the halfcrown the king’s hair flies out behind giving an illusion of speed, and it is accepted that the medal served as a model for the skilled but unknown hand who engraved the coinage die. Michael Sharp has further suggested that, given the commemorative nature of the date and the way it forms an integral part of the shield containing the Royal arms, 1642 may refer to the raising of the king’s standard at Nottingham on 22 August 1642 at the beginning of the Civil War. The association with the Scots Rebellion medal might underline this significance, 1639 being the last previous year in which the king’s standard had been raised. The reason why a coin of such exceptional execution and design, unparalleled in any other Civil War issue, should be produced at Exeter in 1644 is not certain. Besly refers to the personal visit of the King to Exeter in July 1644, and the Royalist victory over the Earl of Essex at Lostwithiel in the following month, but there still remains some mystery attached to this fascinating piece

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1643 Charles I Bristol Mint Halfcrown

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Bristol Mint (1643 – 5) Halfcrown, 1643, mm. plume on obv., Br on rev., Bristol plumelet behind horseman, rev. Declaration, three plumes above (S.3007 N2489 Bull 638/10c; Morr. D-10; SCBI Brooker 975) – Weight 13.99 grams

A few areas of striking weakness, otherwise much as struck with a quite possibly the finest and most detailed equestrian portrait, very rare this choice !

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Halfcrown

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Oxford Mint (1642 – 46), 1643, mm. Oxford plume on obv. only, Oxford horseman, Oxford plume in field behind,  no groundline rev. colon before legend, three Oxford plumes above Declaration, date below (S 2954 : N 2413 ; Brooker 890 : Bull 601/3a ) – Weight 14.89 grams

A wonderful example, the portrait inparticular superb in comparison to what is normally encountered, attractive tone, GVF

Provenance – Ex Arthur Chesser Collection, Lot 39

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Halfpound

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Charles I, half pound, Oxford mint, mm. plume/ -, 1643, crowned figure of king on horseback, brandishing sword, plume behind, rev. declaration in two lines, three plumes and value above, date below (S.2945A; N.2404) – Weight 58.31grams

Well-centred on a very large flan, attractive grey tone, about extremely fine, and to date the finest 1643 Half pound we have handled or seen available for sale, thus rare

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Unite

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Oxford mint (1642 – 46) Unite, 1643, crowned bust l., holding sword and olive branch, mark of value behind, rev. declaration on scroll, date below, three plumes above,  mm. plume. (S.2734; N.2389) -Weight – 8.69 grams

A little weakness around the legends, otherwise struck on a good size flan, about good very fine with a strong portrait.

Provenance

Ex Heckett collection, Sotheby’s, 25 May 1977 

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1643 Charles I Oxford Mint Unite

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Oxford Mint (1642-6) crowned and mantled bust left, holding sword and laurel branch; XX behind Rev. Declaration RELIG : PROT/LEG : ANG/LIBER : PAR in three lines continuous scroll. Three Oxford plumes above , 1643 below

Although on a small flan overall Very Fine woth a superb portrait. 

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1643 Charles Oxford Mint Crown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Oxford Mint (1642 – 46) Crown, Oxford Horseman, grass below. Rev. Three Oxford Plumes, 1643 mm. plume/- (s.2947 : Brooker 873 – this coin)

Slight weakness on the horse, otherwise a superbly toned, Good Very Fine. Offered with both the Lockett and Brooker original tickets

Provenance

L.E. Bruun, Sotheby, 18-22 May 1925, lot 782

A. Thelluson, Sotheby, 19-20 October 1931, lot 237

R.C. Lockett, Glendining, October 11-17, 1956, lot 2446

Spink acquired from J.G. Brooker , 1978

Ex Magnus Collection, Spink, March 2012

 

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1644 Charles I Chester Mint Halfcrown

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Chester Mint (1644) Halfcrown, King in armour holding sword upright, riding left. Rev. Declaration RELIG.PRO.LEG. .AMG.LIBER.PAR., three small plumes above, date (1644) below. Legend reads EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI, double pellet/pellet stops m.m. sword erect between three gerbs/plume (S. 3133 : N.2630 : Brooker 1112 (same dies) : Bull 577) – Weight 14.78 grams

A pleasing matt tone, struck a tad off centre otherwise probably Good Very Fine for issue and very rare.

Provenance

Ex Patrick Finn List 3, Winter 1994/5, no. 352

Ex Spink Auction 117, 19 November 1996, lot 361 

Ex Colin Adams Collection, Spink, 1st December 2005, lot 247 (Sold for £3,200 + %)

Ex Roderick Richardson (£5,750)

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1644 Charles I Oxford Mint Rawlins Crown

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Charles I (1625 – 49), Oxford mint (1642 – 46) , Rawlins’ crown, mm. floriated cross on obverse only, 1644, crowned figure of king on horseback l., brandishing sword, riding over a view of the city, rev. floral scrolls above and below Declaration, value and three plumes above, date and OXON below (S.2948; N.2407; Morr.A-I) – Weight 27.18 grams
 Characteristic weakness at sides as is usual with coins struck in a rocker press, some double striking on obverse, Good Very Fine with a superb pedigree and of the highest of rarity.
 
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1645 Charles I Newak Shilling

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Newark besieged (1645-6) Arched crown between CR, mark of value below, Rev. OBS NEWARK, 1645 below (S.3143; N.2639) – Weight 5.52 grams

Attractively toned, Extremely fine and regarded as the “finest” known example, thus extremely rare. With auction prices particularly strong in high end coins, here is an opportunity to obtain a extremely rare (because of its state of preservation) and historic coin.

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1648 Charles I Heart Shaped Lockett

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Charles I (1625 – 49) Silver Royalist Memorial Heart shaped Locket Circa 1649. Inside the Locket an oval badge of Charles I, outside both sides engraved.

A truely exquisite memento made by a Royalist supporter to show their allegiance. Presumably made after the Kings death in 30th Jan 1648/9. Extremely rare and most desirable 

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1648 Charles I Pontefract Shilling

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Charles I (1625 – 49) , Pontefract besieged, posthumous shilling, 1648, in the name of Charles II, CAROL:II:D:G:MAG:BF:ET:H:REX around, HANC:DE VS:DEDIT in two lines in centre, crown above and date below, rev. POST:MORTEM:PATRIS:PRO:FILIO, castle gateway, central tower with flag divides PC, OBS to left (S.3151; N.2649; SCBI Brooker 1235, same dies)

An incredible piece of civil war numismatic art. Struck from cut silver plate and made after the execution of Charles I. The wonderful details of both the obverse and reverse excellently formed and the intricately engraved brickwork on the castle superbly well struck and in high relief. Virtually Extremely fine and  very very rare in such a fantastic state of preservation !

Pontefract and the Civil War 

The medieval castle at Pontefract, in West Yorkshire, was key to the royalist hold of the region. It was besieged twice, first just before Christmas 1644, enduring bombardment; during the short periods lacking warfare the castle still lacked access to normal supplies. It was surrendered in July 1645, only to be attacked again in the early summer of 1648 during the second segment of the Civil War. The royalist army refused to surrender even after the king was captured, tried, and executed, declaring the city to be the property of the king’s son and employing the city’s motto, “Post mortem patris pro filio”, in support of the monarchy. After a continual siege of nine months, the city and castle were surrendered to Oliver Cromwell himself. Because the castle had long been poorly maintained and was difficult to defend, Parliament ordered it demolished before the year ended. J.J. North comments that the “main issue of Pontefract consists of shillings, which have a representation of the castle gateway as reverse type. As the siege continued after the death of Charles I, some of these bear the name of his son Charles II, with the inscription POST MORTEM PATRIS PRO FILIO (After the death of his father, for the son).” On the other side appears the Latin slogan HANC DEVS DEDIT (“God has given this”) and the date (very clear) below, yet another indication of the monarchy’s ancient claim to rule as its divine right. C.E. Challis illuminates the rarity of these late Civil War issues thus: “Apart from their numismatic interest, which they share with the siege-pieces struck in the beleaguered royalist fortresses at Carlisle, Newark, Pontefract and Scarborough, all the royalist provincial coinages of the civil war have one thing in common, fewness of numbers. For all his access to the silver from Wales and the plate of colleges, aristocrats and the like, Charles I never achieved a bullion supply in any way commensurate with that of Parliament. In all probability the output of all his mints during the entire conflict was no more in total than two or three average month’s output at the Tower between 1642 and 1645.”

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1648 Charles I Pontefract Shilling

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Pontefract besieged (June 1648 – March 1648/9)  Posthumous shilling, in the name of Charles II, CAROL : II : D : G : MAG : BF : ET :H : REX around, HANC : DE VS : DEDIT in two lines in centre, crown above and date below, Rev. POST : MORTEM : PATRIS : PRO : FILIO, castle gateway, central tower with flag divides PC, OBS to left (S.3151; N.2649; SBrooker 1235, same dies)

Almost Very fine and rare 

Provenance

Dupree Collection

 

The Second Civil War – Pontefract Castle

The castle was seized on June 2, 1648 on behalf of the King, Charles I by a colonel a John Morris, who was serving under the commands of Sir Marmaduke Langdale (1st Baron of Langdale – who was a Royalist cavalry officer who commanded the volatile Northern Horse and was one of seven Royalists excluded from pardon for their roles in the wars). The castle was actually seized by a small group dressed as peasants who overcame the local garrison and took control of the most important point to the north. Pontefract resisted all of the attempted attacks by the Parliamentrian forces and it was only in March 1648/9 that Cromwell gained control of Pontefract castle, some two months after the execution of Charles I.

The siege coins were in two groups those issued during the reighn of Charles I and those after his exection and in the name of Charles II his son. 

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1651 Commonwealth Pattern Halfcrown

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Pattern Halfcrown, 1651, with lettered edge, by Blondeau, English shield of arms within wreath, rev. conjoined shields, mark of value above (ESC.444 : N.2732)

Attractive dark tone, Good Very fine and rare

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1651 Commonwealth Unite

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Unite, 1651, mm. sun, English shield of arms within wreath, rev. conjoined shields of St. George, mark of value above, and date at top of beaded circle (S.3208; N.2715)

A most pleasant red tone, slight signs of a very faint wave in the flan, otherwise good very fine. Removed from NGC holder where it was graded XF45 (NGC ticket still available with coin)

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1653 Commonwealth Crown

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Shield of St. George withing wreath. Rev. conjoined shield of England and Ireland mark of value above. mm. Sun (S.3214 : ESC 6) – Weight 30.35 grams

Beautifully toned with great eye appeal, Almost Extremely fine and rare thus. When this Crown was last sold (15/11/2001) it realised £1,610, althought this doesnt seem like a great amount of money today, that figure is almost 3 times the VF price given by Spink in the Standard Catalogue at the time of the sale.

Provenance

Ex Westminster School Collection, Sothebys Sothebys 26 – 27th May 1974, lot 492

Ex Edward Van Roekel Collection, Spink Sale 1286, 15th Novemeber 2001, Lot 80, (Realised £1,610 + Comm*)

Ex Highgate Collection

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1653 Commonwealth Halfcrown

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Halfcrown, 1653,  English shield, laurel and palm branch surrounding, mint mark sun, legends in English, rev English and Irish shield, value above, within beaded circle, date above (ESC 431; N 2722; S 3215)

Far superior to the normally encountered specimens of this some what common date Halfcrown. A tantilizing coin specimen and incredible in hand, the flan is of particular good size and almost fully round ,the toning breathtaking with hues of blue green and sun blush gold. Approaching Extremely Fine and rare this choice

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1653 Commonwealth Halfcrown

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Halfcrown, 1653,  English shield, laurel and palm branch surrounding, mint mark sun, legends in English, rev English and Irish shield, value above, within beaded circle, date above (ESC 431; N 2722; S 3215)

Attractive glossy dark patina with sharp details, overall a really Good Very Fine

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1656 Oliver Cromwell Proof Broad

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Oliver Cromwell, Proof Broad, 1656, by Simon, laur. head l., rev. crowned shield of arms (S.3225)

Graded PR61 PCGS, with superb detail of every part of the engraving. The surfaces, showing a few tiny nicks, and abrasions, from handling. A comparable specimen sold in a recent Auction for $128,000. 

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1656/4 Commonwealth Crown

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) 1656/4 Crown, Shield of St. George within wreath. Rev. conjoined shield of England and Ireland mark of value above. mm. Sun.  (S.3214 : ESC 9) Weight – 29.88 grams

Struck on a full flan, and only slightly double struck in parts. Better than Very Fine and a most pleasing example of the scarce overdate.

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1658 Oliver Cromwell Shilling

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Oliver Cromwell, Silver Shilling, 1658, laureate and draped bust left, rev crowned quartered shield of arms of the Protectorate, edge grained (N 2747; S 3228).

Graded PCGS MS63 (cert number 30824522 – only one coin graded higher on PCGS Population report) Attractively toned and rare so well graded 

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1658/7 Oliver Cromwell Crown

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Commonwealth (1649 – 60) Oliver Cromwell,  Crown, 1658/7 . Draped bust of the ‘Lord Protector’ facing left. Rev. Crowned shield and date 1658 (last digit of date struck over 7) above. Edge inscribed in raised lettering. (ESC 10; S.3226)

A few trivial surface marks otherwise an impressive Extremely Fine with excellent mirrored fields. The die flaw, which plagues the entire mintage of this most famous crown, at its earliest stage, and almost no existent. 

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1662 Charles II Crown

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Charles II (1660-85), Crown, 1662, first laureate and draped bust right, rose below, rev crowned cruciform emblematic shields, interlinked Cs in angles, garter star at centre, date either side of crown over top English shield, edge inscribed  (S.3350 : ESC.15)

A very attractive specimen of this first issue milled crown of Charles II. Struck on a very broad flan, this handsome crown exhibits a very well defined portrait of the King and reverse, wonderfully highlighted by hints of orange lusterous tones. The obverse die showing signs of age with some of the lettering in the legends broken (this would also explain the softness of strike shown in the kings hair) otherwise an extremely strong Good Very Fine and rare in such a state of perservation.

The rose under the King’s head signifies that the silver was English. ‘In May 1661 [Charles] ordered that all coinage should be struck by machines, with edges either lettered or grained [and] demonetisation of the Commonwealth coinage was proclaimed as from 30 November. And Simon himself was sent to France to bring back the engineer Blondeau, to whom £1,000 was later to be paid for his mechanical equipment. While this was being installed [a] competition for the commissioning of the new dies was held between Simon and John Roettier, whom Charles had sent for from Flanders, not unmindful of the monetary help the family had given him in exile [and] Roettier was to have the work’.

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1662 Charles II Crown

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Charles II, Crown, 1662, first laur. bust r., rose below , edge dated. Rev. Crowned cruciform shields, interlinked C’s in angles (S.3351 : ESC. 15)

Pleasing specimen, with superb eye appeal, however evidence of being removed from a mount at 12 o’clock and six o’clock on the letter edge.

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1664 Charles II Two Guineas

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Charles II (1660 – 85) Two Guineas, 1664, first laur. bust r., elephant below, rev. crowned cruciform shields, sceptres in angles (S.3334)

Extremely fine and glowing with gorgeous eye-appeal. The finest specimen of this type two guinea we have encountered. This type Two Guineas is normally only encountered in a worn state of preservation, however this beautiful early milled gold coin is a remarakable survivor of the 17th Century. The level of detail is delightful and you would be hard pushed to find a more pleasing example.

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