1853 VICTORIA PROOF SOVEREIGN

Victoria (1837 – 1901) Proof Sovereign, 1853, second larger young head left, w.w incuse on truncatio, rev crowned quartered shield of arms within laurel wreath (S 3852D; WR 305 R3) .

PCGS graded PR65DCAM and considered one of the finest known specimens to exist.

Notes below are extracts from the Bentley Catalogue

” The 1853 Proof Sovereign struck from highly polished dies is a coin that was included in the very rare “Proof Sets” of all the coinage that were available for purchase from the Court Jeweller “Hunt and Roskell”. The coins were available to purchase singly too and this is one of the rarer Proof Sovereigns of the reign. The Proof Sets of 1853 are the rarest the Mint has ever produced in pre-decimal times and are generally considered the fourth set to have been officially issued. With this Proof Sovereign note the new rendition of w.w on the truncation with only the single stop between the letters. It is questionable if perhaps these sets were produced as a memorial to their designer William Wyon who died 29 October 1851, aged about 56, and the incuse letters perhaps could be a metaphor for him being deceased, and under the level plain rather than living and above it. Such an intention would never have been recorded, but further research into the reasoning for issue of the 1853 Proof Sets and the differing ww treatment on the truncation of the Sovereign would be very useful. The 1853 Proof Set is one of the most attractive sets, containing arguably one of Wyon’s finest designs, the silver Gothic style Crown, first produced as an excessively rare pattern in 1846 and then as a proof for sale in 1847, with supposedly about 8000 struck. Estimates of issue for the 1853 Proof Set have ranged from 150 to 400, though it is still an unknown quantity for sure. The Sovereign for the first time, is the highest value coin in the 1853 Proof Set when compared with the three previous official Proof Sets. “


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Victoria (1837 – 1901) Proof Sovereign, 1853, second larger young head left, w.w incuse on truncatio, rev crowned quartered shield of arms within laurel wreath (S 3852D; WR 305 R3) .

PCGS graded PR65DCAM and considered one of the finest known specimens to exist.

Notes below are extracts from the Bentley Catalogue

” The 1853 Proof Sovereign struck from highly polished dies is a coin that was included in the very rare “Proof Sets” of all the coinage that were available for purchase from the Court Jeweller “Hunt and Roskell”. The coins were available to purchase singly too and this is one of the rarer Proof Sovereigns of the reign. The Proof Sets of 1853 are the rarest the Mint has ever produced in pre-decimal times and are generally considered the fourth set to have been officially issued. With this Proof Sovereign note the new rendition of w.w on the truncation with only the single stop between the letters. It is questionable if perhaps these sets were produced as a memorial to their designer William Wyon who died 29 October 1851, aged about 56, and the incuse letters perhaps could be a metaphor for him being deceased, and under the level plain rather than living and above it. Such an intention would never have been recorded, but further research into the reasoning for issue of the 1853 Proof Sets and the differing ww treatment on the truncation of the Sovereign would be very useful. The 1853 Proof Set is one of the most attractive sets, containing arguably one of Wyon’s finest designs, the silver Gothic style Crown, first produced as an excessively rare pattern in 1846 and then as a proof for sale in 1847, with supposedly about 8000 struck. Estimates of issue for the 1853 Proof Set have ranged from 150 to 400, though it is still an unknown quantity for sure. The Sovereign for the first time, is the highest value coin in the 1853 Proof Set when compared with the three previous official Proof Sets. “

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